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Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
declaring war irdlede pscriptiondrugexpaded they are concerned with the lack of accountability in government. in the case of occupy, it's wall street, and guess what -- they are both right. >> he summed it up beautifully. >> when you were running, it was a matter of people getting to call into an 800-number. now we're into this world of social media, where you can tweet something out in a matter of seconds. do you think that would make a third-party iran or any kind of a people's movement easier today than it was 20 years ago when you had to rely on people calling in to a phone number? do you think the computer revolution, which you have been involved since the start, and in particular at the social media revolution of the last several years, should create a situation where you are on twitter, where you can mobilize people more easily? >> sure. >> shouldn't that make the type of solution you are talking about, people demanding change, similar to have? >> that is what we need, and i think that is a good way to do it. >> the problem would be they have the tools today to instantly to mobilize.
conservative as katherine made clear, there's nothing conservative about a government that prevents a woman from making her own health care decisions. governor romney talks about freedom. but freedom is the ability to determine the care you need when you need it. freedom is the ability to change jobs or start your own business without the fear of losing your health insurance. freedom is the knowledge that you'll no longer be charged more than men for the same health care. or denied affordable coverage just because you've beat cancer. and at a time when women make up nearly half the work force, and an increasing share of family bread winners, these are not just health issues or women's issues. these are economic issues that are vital and affect every family in america. they matter. when -- when a woman is the main bread winner for her family but takes home less pay for the same work, as a man does because she's a woman, that is not right. when my opponent's campaign was asked if he'd support legislation given -- giving women the tools to fight for an equal day's pay for an equal day's work,
of that nature. now, it's different whether there's a government grant, where the market power derives from political authority. and that's true of some of the essential facility cases. stadiums, stadium approvals and the like. but if the facility has become essential through market processes, which is surely the case of google, it represents success. and that firm is entitled to all the reward it can gain. now, greg and bob do a terrific job of showing why the google experience does not fit the scraps of law on essential facilities. but i think they should go further. they should deny that there's any merit to the concept at all. now, i think this is true of other parts of the paper. as i alluded to earlier, much of the paper is empirical. and i learned a lot from it really. there's a lot of detail in it. and i learned a lot. but the -- those responses and that empirical -- making the point that criticism by competitors of google's practices are just wrong on the facts. but i think that that's not enough. especially in representing the chicago school. the failings of the arguments by googl
, but the takeaway is that this government is still strong in and around the capital. >> we have been reporting in the last 18 or so months what is the number, 28,000 syrians have been killed during this civil war, since last march. we have shown the pictures from aleppo and places like that. then you talk to the women, getting manicures, in the capital city of damascus, who aren't necessarily pro assad, who aren't necessarily pro rebel, stuck in the middle. here is that they told you. >> on many days the death toll around the capital far higher than for other cities. but where they can, people are trying to hold on to their old lives. for this woman, that's a few minutes at the beauty salon. it may look like normal life, but it is not. >> every day we hearing this boom, boom. and everything else. and there is a lot going on. >> you don't worry about it? >> i worry. i worry sick about it, but nothing we can do. >> reporter: she tells me she hates the killing, supports neither government nor rebels. wants them to talk, feels stuck in the middle. so too the salon's owner. >> i cannot go to the co
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)